Lindemann Help Center

    • Seal Tight/Energy Top Adhesive:
      Cap Adhesive:
      ChimneySaver/MasonrySaver: 40-100 degrees F
      FlashSeal: Above 45 degrees F
      CrownCoat: 45 degrees and above
      Cold Weather CrownCoat: -40 degrees F and above
      CrownSeal: 45-95 degrees F
      Defy Epoxy Fortified Wood Stain: 45-95 degrees F
      Defy Wood Stain Stripper: Above 50 degrees F
      Defy Wood Brightener: 45-95 degrees F
      Defy Wood Cleaner: 45-95 degrees F
      Defy Roof Cleaner: Above 70 degrees F
      Defy Stain Blocker for Roofs: Above 70 degrees F

    • Seal Tight/Energy Top Adhesive:
      Cap Adhesive:
      ChimneySaver/MasonrySaver: Square feet per gallon: brick wall:100-150; concrete block: 50-75; concrete, stucco, limestone and sandstone: 75-150.
      FlashSeal: 1 gallon covers 28 linear feet
      CrownCoat: 40 square feet per gallon
      Cold Weather CrownCoat: 28 square feet per gallon
      CrownSeal: At 1/8" thickness = 14-18 square feet per gallon. At 1/4" thickness = 7-9 square feet per gallon.
      Defy Epoxy Fortified Wood Stain: 100-150 square feet per gallon
      Defy Wood Stain Stripper: 250 square feet per gallon for roofs
      Defy Wood Brightener: 100-200 square feet per gallon
      Defy Wood Cleaner: 100-150 square feet per gallon
      Defy Roof Cleaner: 100-200 square feet per gallon
      Defy Stain Blocker for Roofs: 700-900 square feet per gallon

    • Leg Kits are available for all single-flue caps. They attach to the set screws on the cap and protrude down into the flue. Not secure in high winds.

    • A minimum of 5" of screen height is a pretty good rule of thumb.

    • Chimney top dampers come with masonry anchors for attaching the bracket to a masonry firebox wall. For metal fireboxes, pick up a "tap and die" kit, found at hardware and automotive stores, and drill and thread the hole. Then use screws to attach the bracket.

    • Sometimes, during a chimney fire, the stainless steel springs supporting the lid may fail. This causes the lid to close and smoke to back up into the home. The Chimney Fire Safety Device has a lead device that melts, releasing metal legs which support the lid in an open position.

    • The Energy Top relies on a special stainless support springs. As an added safety feature the extra strong lid is constructed of aluminum, which during extreme chimney fire temperatures, would melt before the support springs would fail. This ensures the smoke is able to safely escape through the top of the flue. This assures operation of the damper without regard to a previous installer failing to include a safety device.

    • The adhesive must cure for at least 24 hours in the closed position before opening.

    • Enervex fans equipped with a dial control which allows a variation of settings to obtain the proper draft. It also allows the fan to be run on a minimal setting during the warmer months of the year, exhausting damp odors from the flue. It uses about as much electricity as a candescent light bulb.

    • The motor is sealed and requires no maintenance. The fan blades are attached to the lid and, along with the screen, need to be cleaned periodically. The lid attaches to the base and opens easily on a hinge. This also moves the fan lid and blades out of the way for cleaning.

    • Insulation is required when the liner is listed with it. Usually, this is dependant on the type of fuel being burned. In wood and coal burning applications, insulation is always required for a UL Listing. For oil and gas, insulation is usually not required. Check the specific liner installation instructions for the type of insulation and installation requirements.

    • A chimney liner insulated with TherMix insulation may be used after the installation is complete as long as flue gas temperatures do not exceed 1000º F during the first 48 hours of actual use.

    • Along with the proper type of ceramic blanket you will need Super 77 Spray Adhesive, Foil Tape, ProMesh Wire Mesh and a Make-A-Clamp Kit to complete most insulation requirements. Consult the liner manufacturer's installation instructions for specifics.

    • Each appliance has its own listing requirements and clearances are a part of the listing. Consult the appliance manufacturer.

    • The Flashing is packaged without the Storm Collar so remember to order this separately. Chimney lengths may be ordered with a Galvalume, Stainless Steel or Black outer wall. When using a Round Ceiling Support, a Round or Square Trim Collar must be ordered separately. On exterior Tee Support installations, a Wall Strap must be used every 8 feet. When using Wall Thimble, remember to order the appropriate length of Insulated DuraTech to pass through the thimble, extending at least 6" into the room. Also, remember to order the Finishing Collar and either the Snap-Lock or DVL Adaptor to transition to black stovepipe. If Elbows are used in an installation, an Elbow Strap must be used between the offset and return Elbows. When using the Round Ceiling Support, Square Support Box or Cathedral Support, the Snap-Lock Adaptor must be used to transition to single-wall black stovepipe. When using double-wall DVL DuraVent Stovepipe, a DVL Adaptor must be used. When using a Roof Support, remember to order the Roof Support Trim, Finishing Collar and either the Snap-Lock or DVL Adaptor to transition to black stovepipe.

    • 2 inches

    • 1 inch

    • Speedy White cleaner

    • The Skamol Panels have been tested by Omni Labs to the UL 127 standard and found to meet the thermal and strength requirements as an aftermarket replacement panel.

    • Skamol Panels can be cut with ordinary wood-working tools.

    • ChimneySaver® Brick & Mortar Cleaner. This concentrated cleaner works well for masonry surfaces excluding limestone.

    • White Off Gas Fireplace Cleaner does a great job with minimal effort.

    • It is important to not exceed a maximum application thickness greater than 1/4". This type of product is an air-dry and heat-cure mortar. If it's applied greater than 1/4" it won't dry out and will either crack or when heat is applied the moisture will turn to steam, causing a blistering affect.

    • This is caused by the lack of a gap between the flue tile and the chimney crown. Often, when crowns are mortared right next to a tile, the crown may lift when the tile is heated and expands. This lets moisture in and can result in freeze/thaw damage. The best way to remedy this situation is to replace the crown and rebuild the top rows of spalled brick. And, fill the gap with a high temp silicone exterior rated or a product approved for this use.

    • Efflorescence is white mineral salts that are deposited on the exterior of the chimney caused when moisture wicks through the mortar joints. This moisture can be in the form of a missing chimney cap, missing or damaged mortar joints, porous brick or a gas appliance being vented directly into the chimney. ChimneySaver® Brick & Mortar Cleaner may help to remove some of the stain; otherwise a mixture of muriatic acid and water usually cleans it up. Muriatic acid is usually a last result because it can etch the brick and special precautions must be used when applying it. Sometimes, the efflorescence can be brushed off or cleaned with water and a stiff brush. If the brick or mortar joints are porous, treating the chimney with ChimneySaver® Water Repellent and repairing the joints with Crack & Joint Repair by SaverSystems®, often preserves the chimney and eliminates complete replacement.

    • This can usually be solved by installing a Vacustack® cap. However, the problem must be qualified to make sure that it is only the wind being blown down the flue that causes this problem. Usually, the harder the wind blows the worse the problem is. The Vacustack® works by actually creating an updraft due to the way the wind hits the cap.

    • This is a pressure issue that's caused when the wind hits the side of the house that the fireplace/stove is located on. For instance, the fireplace/stove is located on the wall of the north end of the house. When the wind blows from the house it hits the north side (high pressure side) and circles around the house. On the south side, there's a negative pressure area which acts as a suction pulling smoke or cold air down the flue. On this side of the house the doors will be hard to open or shut. This can usually be proven by opening a window on the windward side (north). If this is the case, an Air Supply Ventilator may solve the case.

    • This often happens with a fireplace that's located on the outside wall of a home. Cold air can usually be felt coming into the home through the fireplace damper. In this instance, the flue usually needs to be pre-warmed. This can be accomplished with a newspaper rolled up, lit, and held near an open damper. A hair dryer is another way to start warm air moving up the flue. Wax firebricks, Gelled Fire Starter, or Firestarter Blocks also help to warm up the flue with little smoke. Another option is installing an Enervex® Fan which ensures draft on start-up as well as avoiding smoke when the fire dies down and everything cools again.

    • This is usually caused by insufficient oxygen. A fireplace can use the combined air leaks of a 36" circle. Older homes that haven't been sided, have original leaky windows, and have poor insulation may have this combined "combustion air" available. Modern homes or homes with siding, house wrap, insulation, tight windows and doors only have a combined air leak of 8" which is the size of a dinner plate. That's not enough for the average fireplace. Other factors that can cause this problem are down-flow kitchen range vents, air exhaust appliances kicking on and installed house vacuums in use. Use of these appliances may need to be discontinued while the fireplace is in use. Also, air should be introduced and sometimes one or more Air Supply Ventilator may be enough to supplement the fireplace. The air requirement can be tested by cracking a window open and gradually opening it to the point where the fireplace stops smoking. An Enervex® Fan may also be installed. If properly adjusted, it shouldn't use any more air than when the fireplace is drafting correctly. However, be cautious that it doesn't remove combustion air that another appliance, such as a furnace or water heater, need to function properly.

    • A constantly smoking fireplace is usually indicative of a construction issue. The flue should be approximately 1/10th of the fireplace opening. If it's much smaller, it could cause the fireplace to smoke. A Smoke Guard, installed at the top width of the fireplace opening, may cut down on the opening enough to correct the flue to fireplace ratio. Another instance where the Smoke Guard may help is if the damper is too close to the fireplace opening or if the fireplace is taller than it is wide.

      Sometimes, a top sealing damper reduces the flue opening enough to cause an otherwise working fireplace to smoke. Installing a Smoke Guard may remedy the situation.

      Our Seal Tight Damper® can allow up to 15% more airflow than other similar dampers. The Energy Top® opens as much as 81% higher than the competition ensuring it's less restrictive than competitive dampers.

    • If a cap has insufficient screen height or if the draft is marginal it could cause the fireplace to smoke. A good rule of thumb is that the lid of the cap should be a minimum of 5" taller than the tallest flue tile. Sometimes, when multiple flues are present, a basement stove or fireplace will pull smoke or a smoky smell down into the basement. Usually, only cold air was pulled down previously. With a cap in place, it captures the smoke long enough for the smoke or smell to be present. For a fireplace, a Seal Tight® Damper might fit under the cap. This tight sealing damper usually solves the problem.

    • Cre-Away® is a powder that can be applied through the woodstove or fireplace by the homeowner. However, for a severe situation such as this, a professional application is usually required. Cre-Away® is a four-component powder that has a dehydrator that helps to dry out the creosote so it can be easily removed by sweeping. It also has a fire suppressant which helps to reduce the chance of a chimney fire during treatment. It may take multiple applications and cleaning but this is the best way to remove this type of creosote.

    • Several products are available for use depending on the severity of the glaze:

      Chemical Removal: If a few small spots are evident, using Stage 2 or Anti-Creosote (ACS) every day for a couple of weeks may be enough to loosen the creosote so a follow-up cleaning could remove it. If the glaze is more severe, or if you have concerns about a possible chimney fire, then Stage 3 or Cre-Away may be needed. Stage 3 is sprayed in the flue and allowed to dry. It may take several applications for removal. Cre-Away should be professionally applied to ensure even coating of the glaze. Since it includes a fire inhibitor, careful burning can be continued while it's working. Follow-up cleaning may remove the glaze or it may take multiple applications.

      Mechanical Removal: If the creosote build-up is 1/4" or less the Stinger Whip or Wizard may be used. These devices attach to special rods which, in turn, attach to a drill. They spin around and scrub the creosote via abrasion from the cables. If more than 1/4" or more of build-up is present, the Chain Whip or Glaze Removal Chains are more effective.

    • Moisture could be coming from a gas appliance vented into the flue. Check to see if this is the cause. If it is, it needs to have a liner or a special vent installed. When a chimney has porous brick or weak mortar joints deterioration starts to take place when water enters the chimney. If this moisture freezes it expands and can damage the mortar joints or cause the brick face to fall off (spalling). ChimneySaver® is a water repellent that repels moisture yet still lets moisture escape through the chimney (vapor permeable). In case of overspray, the area must be cleansed immediately with a strong solution of dish soap and water. Use caution because this will likely create a slippery roof.

    • The best product is MasonrySaver®. Damage and stains to driveways, walkways, patios and concrete surfaces surrounding pools can be prevented. It is more resistant to salts often found on these surfaces. It will also repel water borne stains and grime, keeping the surface cleaner. It won't alter the surface color.

    • Damaged or deteriorated flashing can lead to a damaged roof deck or interior finishes. Often, the chimney structure is accused of causing the problem. FlashSeal® stops flashing leaks around chimneys, stacks and vents. It's a two-fold repair system with FlashSeal® Elastomeric Sealant being applied first to the chimney and roof. Reinforcement Fabric is then applied over the FlashSeal®, then a second coat of FlashSeal® is applied, sandwiching the Reinforcement Fabric in the middle. When properly installed, it solves the problem and carries a 7 year warranty.

    • If there are moisture stains on ceilings or walls it's likely that the dryer vent may have separated. The stains don't even have to be exactly at the separation but are usually in the near vicinity. The Noise Maker is a great tool to use to identify this type of situation. It attaches to the ButtonLok® Dryer Vent Rods, then to the Dryer Vent Drill Adaptor into your drill. The Noise Maker can pinpoint the separation location – the noise will stop. This is very helpfully when needing to cut into a wall or ceiling to repair the vent.

    • A clogged dryer vent can extend drying time as well causing exhaust products to back up into the home. The Dryer Vent Diagnostic Tools can be used to identify a blockage. Once determined, the Blockage Removal Tool helps to remove bird's nest or hardened lint clogs. It attaches to Buttonlock® Dryer Vent Rods, which in turn attach to a drill with the Dryer Vent Drill Adaptor. The Noise Maker is very useful in pinpointing the location of the clog.

  • We understand that you, as a business owner, don’t always have the convenience of having problems arise during the hours of 8-5. That’s why we are happy to provide this Troubleshooting Corner for your convenience. Be sure to check back frequently since we will continually add to this section.

    • Spalling Chimney (brick face damage) or missing mortar:

      There should always be a gap between the flue tile and the chimney crown. Often, when crowns are mortared right next to a tile, the crown may lift when the tile is heated and expands. This lets moisture in and can result in freeze/thaw damage. The best way to remedy this situation is to replace the crown and rebuild the top rows of spalled brick. An exterior mortar such as Rutland® Exterior Chimney Masonry Patch or type M Mortar mixed with PWR® must be used.

      White Stains on Chimney Exterior:

      Efflorescence is white mineral salts that are deposited on the exterior of the chimney when moisture wicks through the mortar joints. This moisture can be in the form of a missing chimney cap, missing or damaged mortar joints, porous brick or a gas appliance being vented directly into the chimney. ChimneySaver® Brick & Mortar Cleaner may help to remove some of the stain; otherwise a mixture of muriatic acid and water usually cleans it up. Muriatic acid is usually a last result because it can etch the brick and special precautions must be used when applying it.

      Often, the efflorescence can be brushed off or cleaned with water and a stiff brush. If the brick or mortar joints are porous, treating the chimney with ChimneySaver® Water Repellent and repairing the joints with Crack Magik®, often preserves the chimney and eliminates complete replacement.

    • Gooey/Tar-Like Creosote:

      Cre-Away® is a powder that can be applied through the woodstove or fireplace by the homeowner. However, for a severe situation such as this, a professional application is usually required. Cre-Away® is a four-component powder that has a dehydrator that helps to dry out the creosote so it can be easily removed by sweeping. It also has a fire suppressant which helps to reduce the chance of a chimney fire during treatment. It may take multiple applications and cleaning but this is the best way to remove this type of creosote.

      Hard Glazed Creosote:

      This baked-on creosote is difficult to remove. Several products are available for use depending on the severity of the glaze.

      Chemical Removal:

      If a few small spots are evident, using Stage 2 or Anti-Creosote (ACS) every day for a couple of weeks may be enough to loosen the creosote so a follow-up cleaning could remove it. If the glaze is more severe, or if you have concerns about a possible chimney fire, then Stage 3 or Cre-Away may be needed. Stage 3 is sprayed in the flue and allowed to dry. It may take several applications for removal. Cre-Away should be professionally applied to ensure even coating of the glaze. Since it includes a fire inhibitor, careful burning can be continued while it’s working. Follow-up cleaning may remove the glaze or it may take multiple applications.

      Mechanical Removal:

      If the creosote build-up is ¼" or less the Stinger Whip or Wizard may be used. These devices attach to special rods which, in turn, attach to a drill. They spin around and scrub the creosote via abrasion from the cables. If more than ¼" or more of build-up is present, the Chain Whip or Glaze Removal Chains are more effective. Never use fiberglass rods with any rotary device. Fiberglass rods are made up of individual strands and cannot take the torque applied when rotary cleaning. Fiberglass rods can cause serious injury in this type of situation. Instead, use ButtonLok Poly or Steel Rods when removing creosote. Also, look for a drill with a clutch so that, in case the tool hangs up below, the clutch should prevent the drill from spinning in your hands causing injury and loss of balance.

    • Wind-related smoking:

      This can usually be solved by installing a Vacustack® cap. However, the problem must be qualified to make sure that it is only the wind being blown down the flue that causes this problem. Usually, the harder the wind blows the worse the problem is. The Vacustack® works by actually creating an updraft due to the way the wind hits the cap.

      Wind-loading smoking:

      This is a pressure issue that’s caused when the wind hits the side of the house that the fireplace/stove is located on. For instance, the fireplace/stove is located on the wall of the north end of the house. When the wind blows from the house it hits the north side (high pressure side) and circles around the house. On the south side, there’s a negative pressure area which acts as a suction pulling smoke or cold air down the flue. On this side of the house the doors will be hard to open or shut. This can usually be proven by opening a window on the windward side (north).

      Fireplace Smokes on Start-Up and When Fire Dies Down:

      This often happens with a fireplace that’s located on the outside wall of a home. Cold air can usually be felt coming into the home through the fireplace damper. In this instance, the flue usually needs to be pre-warmed. This can be accomplished with a newspaper rolled up, lit, and held near an open damper. A hair dryer is another way to start warm air moving up the flue. Wax firebricks, Gelled Fire Starter, or Firestarter Blocks also help to warm up the flue with little smoke. Another option is installing an Enervex® Fan which ensures draft on start-up as well as avoiding smoke when the fire dies down and everything cools again.

      Fireplace Starts and Burns Fine – then Smokes after a While:

      This is usually caused by insufficient oxygen. A fireplace can use the combined air leaks of a 36" circle. Older homes that haven’t been sided, have original leaky windows, and have poor insulation may have this combined “combustion air” available. Modern homes or homes with siding, house wrap, insulation, tight windows and doors only have a combined air leak of 8" which is the size of a dinner plate. That’s not enough for the average fireplace. Air must be introduced, and additional ventilation may be enough to supplement the fireplace. The air requirement can be tested by cracking a window open and gradually opening it to the point where the fireplace stops smoking. An Enervex® Fan may also be installed. If properly adjusted, it shouldn’t use any more air than when the fireplace is drafting correctly. However, be cautious that it doesn’t remove combustion air that another appliance, such as a furnace or water heater, need to function properly.

      Fireplace Smokes all the Time:

      A constantly smoking fireplace is usually indicative of a construction issue. The flue should be approximately 1/10th of the fireplace opening. If it’s much smaller, it could cause the fireplace to smoke. A Smoke Guard, installed at the top width of the fireplace opening, may cut down on the opening enough to correct the flue to fireplace ratio. Another instance where the Smoke Guard may help is if the damper is too close to the fireplace opening or if the fireplace is taller than it is wide.

      Sometimes, a top sealing damper reduces the flue opening enough to cause an otherwise working fireplace to smoke. Installing a Smoke Guard may remedy the situation.

      Our Seal Tight Damper® can allow up to 15% more airflow than other similar dampers. The Energy Top® opens as much as 81% higher than the competition ensuring it’s less restrictive than competitive dampers.

      Fireplace Smokes after a New Cap was Installed:

      If a cap has insufficient screen height or if the draft is marginal it could cause the fireplace to smoke. A good rule of thumb is that the lid of the cap should be a minimum of 5” taller than the tallest flue tile. Sometimes, when multiple flues are present, a basement stove or fireplace will pull smoke or a smoky smell down into the basement. Usually, only cold air was pulled down previously. With a cap in place, it captures the smoke long enough for the smoke or smell to be present. For a fireplace, a Seal Tight® Damper might fit under the cap. This tight sealing damper usually solves the problem.

    • Suspected Separation of Vent/Moisture Stains:

      If there are moisture stains on ceilings or walls it’s likely that the dryer vent may have separated. The stains don’t even have to be exactly at the separation but are usually in the near vicinity. The Noise Maker is a great tool to use to identify this type of situation. It attaches to the ButtonLok® Dryer Vent Rods, then to the Dryer Vent Drill Adaptor into your drill. The Noise Maker can pinpoint the separation location – the noise will stop. This is very helpfully when needing to cut into a wall or ceiling to repair the vent.

      Clogged Vent:

      A clogged dryer vent can extend drying time as well causing exhaust products to back up into the home. The Dryer Vent Diagnostic Tools can be used to identify a blockage. Once determined, the Blockage Removal Tool helps to remove bird’s nest or hardened lint clogs. It attaches to Buttonlock® Dryer Vent Rods, which in turn attach to a drill with the Dryer Vent Drill Adaptor. The Noise Maker is very useful in pinpointing the location of the clog.

    • Exterior Chimney Stains:

      The best chemical for cleaning rust, mildew, algae, smoke and creosote stains on an exterior chimney is the ChimneySaver® Brick & Mortar Cleaner. This concentrated cleaner works well for masonry surfaces excluding limestone. Apply full strength to extra tough stains. General cleaning requires a dilution ratio of 1 to 4 parts water. Apply with a brush, roller, or for large areas, use a sprayer. It covers 50-150 square foot per gallon depending on dilution.

      Interior Stains:

      Interior stains on brick, glass and stone can often be remedied with one of the following cleaners. Speedy White is great for creosote, smoke, soot and grease stains when used on glass, stone and brick. The Soot Eraser works well on soot, smoke residue and dirt from various surfaces. For the baked on carbon and mineral deposits associated with gas fireplaces, White Off Gas Fireplace Cleaner does a great job with minimal effort.

      Set-Up Problems:

      When applying pre-mixed refractory cement or fireplace mortar such as Heat Stop, Rutland® Fireplace Mortar or Domestic Fireplace Mortar, it’s important to not use a maximum application thickness greater than ¼". This type of product is an air-dry and heat-cure mortar. If it’s applied greater than ¼" it won’t dry out and will either crack or when heat is applied the moisture will turn to steam, causing a blistering affect.

      When using Heat Stop II, Rutland® Refractory Dry Mix 211, Chamber-Tech 2000® or Insul Stick, it’s really important to mix water thoroughly or the mix won’t get to full strength. Also, minimum thicknesses must be observed or the material won’t be strong enough to resist cracking and light pressure.

    • ChimneySaver®:

      When moisture enters a chimney through porous brick or weak mortar joints deterioration starts to take place. If this moisture freezes it expands and can damage the mortar joints or cause the brick face to fall off (spalling). ChimneySaver® is a water repellent that repels moisture yet still lets moisture escape through the chimney (vapor permeable). In case of overspray, the area must be cleansed immediately with a strong solution of dish soap and water. Use caution because this will likely create a slippery roof.

      MasonrySaver® Damage and stains to driveways, walkways, patios and concrete surfaces surrounding pools can be prevented with MasonrySaver®. It is more resistant to salts often found on these surfaces. It will also repel water borne stains and grime, keeping the surface cleaner. It won’t alter the surface color.

      PWR® – Powdered Water Repellent:

      When constructing crowns or building a chimney, PWR® can be added to the mortar mix making it waterproof upon drying. It is vapor permeable, allowing internal moisture to escape, while preventing moisture entry from the outside.

      Leaking Flashing:

      Damaged or deteriorated flashing can lead to a damaged roof deck or interior finishes. Often, the chimney structure is accused of causing the problem. FlashSeal® stops flashing leaks around chimneys, stacks and vents. It’s a two-fold repair system with FlashSeal® Elastomeric Sealant being applied first to the chimney and roof. Reinforcement Fabric is then applied over the FlashSeal®, then a second coat of FlashSeal® is applied, sandwiching the Reinforcement Fabric in the middle. When properly installed, it solves the problem and carries a 7 year warranty.

  • Lindemann Chimney Company is one of the largest chimney cleaning service companies around. We have professionaly trained sweeps who work out in the field every day. We take pride in being knowledgeable in all areas of chimney cleaning and care. Our Resources page provides visitors with information and articles on chimney and fireplace care. Be sure to check back here for our most recent articles!

    • If your customers are looking for a quick, inexpensive way to update their fireplace, a coat of high temp stove paint may be the answer. High temp stove paint is a great way to add a new, fresh look to the unit without a complete replacement. Another great reason to use these products – the application is easy.

      Here are some common questions our customers have about high temp stove paint:

      How do I prep the surface prior to painting?

      To ensure a lasting adhesion of the paint, the surface should be properly prepped prior to application. First, it is important that all rust is removed. High Temp Paint does not stop oxidization. For this reason, rust will reappear once again if not completely eliminated. You will also want to make sure you have a bare surface to work with; one free of grease, oil and other contaminants. Use Stove Bright Paint Prep to easily clean the surface before painting.

      Is it best to use aerosol or brush-on paint?

      The choice between aerosol and brush-on paint is often dependent on the user’s personal preference. Some like the control of applying the coats one stroke at a time while others like the ease-of-use of spraying it on. One benefit to aerosol is its ability to easily apply a thin, full-coverage coat.

      Do I need a primer?

      Many high temp stove paints are self-priming with no additional primer needed for most indoor applications. Under rare circumstances (outdoor use and extremely humid climates), a high temp primer may need to be applied prior to painting.

      What types of surfaces can I use this paint on?

      Generally speaking, high temp stove paint can be used on: fire bricks, fireplace screens, woodstoves, steam pipes, boilers, fireplaces, fireplace inserts. It should not be used on: kitchen stoves, kitchen stove burner grates, steam radiators.

      At Lindemann Chimney Supply, we are proud to carry the top brands in the industry including Stove Bright® High Temp Stove Paint and AW Perkins 1400° High Temp Paint as well as Stove Bright Paint Prep. These products are specially-formulated to offer superior performance and lasting results. Contact our experts if you have further questions about high temp stove paint or any of the other quality products we carry.



    • What’s the best way to know if your fire is burning cleanly and efficiently? The answer is simple – a quality thermometer. Keeping a fire within a safe temperature range is important for reducing the chance of creosote buildup and flue damage. If the fire is too hot, it can damage the stove and lead to fire. A blaze that burns too low increases the amount of harmful byproducts that it creates. Anyone who uses a wood stove can benefit from installing a thermometer onto their unit.

      Here are three of the industry’s top wood stove thermometers:

      Flue Gas Probe Thermometer
      With readings up to 2000˚ Fahrenheit, this thermometer features temperature zones to clearly display when the fire is burning too cool, too hot, or at optimum operation. The probe itself is constructed of copper and then coated with a protective porcelain enamel finish.

      Chimguard Energy Meter
      Need a quick fix that is easy to install? The Chimguard Energy Meter magnetically attaches to either a stove pipe or a stove top. It tells the operator precisely how efficient their fire is and provides accurate readings within a 5% range.

      Inferno Stove Top Meter
      Calibrated specifically for the stove top, this thermometer is easy to read and use. The Inferno Stove Top Meter breaks down temperature ranges into three categories: Creosote, Best Zone, and Too Hot.

      When installing a wood stove into your customer’s home suggest that they add a quality thermometer to the unit. This simple, inexpensive device can help save them money on wasted fuel while keeping their blazes within the optimal temperature range. Lindemann Chimney Supply offers a full-range of wood stove thermometers including the ones featured above. Visit our website to learn more.



    • When it comes to determining the liner size for a masonry fireplace, it's just mathematics. Once you understand how the formula works then it becomes easy to size the liners.

      Some manufacturer's such as Duravent provide a liner sizing guide as shown in the example with the fireplace.


      Step 1: Find the width of the fireplace opening on the chart (look for Step 1, at right). In the example they use a 36" width. Hint: Follow the red lines in the example.

      Step 2: Find the height of the fireplace opening. In the example above they use 30".

      Step 3: Find the intersect of these two measurements. Then follow the horizontal line over to the appropriate chimney height. In this example they use 20'.

      Step 4: Where the width/height of the fireplace opening and the chimney height line intersects the liner diameter size is given.

      Another way to determine the liner size is by following some mathematical formulas. It starts with the fireplace opening. In this example we will use the 36" W X 30" H example used above.


      Step 1: Find the cross-sectional area of the fireplace opening. Multiply the W=36" X H=30" and that equals 1080 square inches of fireplace opening.

      Step 2: If you are using a round liner and the chimney height is more than 8' above the fireplace opening you can divide the 1080 by 12. This amount equals 90".

      Step 3: Find the liner size by comparing the 90" to the cross-sectional area chart for round liners in Chart A. A 10" liner only has 78.5" of area and will be too small. An 11" liner has 95" of area so it should work.

      If you are installing an oval liner for a fireplace, calculate the fireplace opening in the same manner as the above formula, but instead divide by 10. See Chart below for oval specs.

      When sizing a fireplace for a square or rectangular liner the 1/10 ratio should be used. This means that the area of the liner should be 1/10th of the fireplace opening. So in the example above where the fireplace had 1080" of area, it should be divided by 10 which means a liner with 108" of area is needed.



      The exception to this rule is when the liner is twice as long as the depth, like a 6 X 12 liner. Then the fireplace opening should be divided by 8 instead of 10.

      To determine the area in a square or rectangular pipe just multiply the length by the depth. For example a liner that is 6" X 10" would be 6 X 10 = 60" of area. For the fireplace above that needs 108" of area, this liner would be way too small. A liner size of 9" X 12" would equal 108" and should just provide enough draft for the above fireplace.



    • Fall is upon us. Are you ready for the busy season? At Lindemann Chimney Supply we have bulked up our inventory in anticipation for an incredible record-breaking year for all of us. We are prepared to assist you in growing your business to new levels.One of the ways you can grow your business is to replace cracked factory-built refractory panels. We have installed Skamol Panels for years in our service company. They are quicker, lighter, and easier to install than the heavy refractory panels.

      Skamol Panels:

      • Save time
      • Less stress
      • Attractive
      • Lightweight - 30 lbs.
      • Easy to Install
      • Easy to maneuver
      • Tested by Omni Labs
      • Available in herringbone or brick patterns
      • Can be cut with ordinary woodworking tools
      • Install in less time that heavy refractory panels
      • Made of asbestos-free compressed vermiculite


      Check out our Skamol Panel options here

    • Whether your customers have a damaged or broken door or are simply looking to update their fireplace, glass door replacement is a common service for a sweep to complete. While the job is often accomplished in a short period of time, there are some ways to make the process even easier.


      Here are the top 6 tips for glass fireplace door replacement:

      1. Take care when replacing doors on older brickwork. It could be brittle and may be more prone to breakage during drilling.
      2. Never lay the replacement door on its front. This could damage the unit.
      3. When drilling the holes for the unit, always drill into brick and not mortar. Also make sure to drill straight down.
      4. Do not over tighten the unit’s screws. This could lead to breakage on the screw’s head or loosen the anchor placed in the brick.
      5. Once in place, gently wiggle the newly installed replacement door checking for any movement. If the unit feels wobbly, check for loose screws you may have missed.
      6. When finished, use water and a rag or specially designed glass cleaner to remove any leftover debris. Do not use oven cleaner as this could scratch the glass.


      If followed on a consistent basis, these 6 tips can make the replacement of your customer’s glass fireplace doors a simple task. Remember also to always measure carefully the existing unit prior to ordering a new one. If you have further questions about glass fireplace replacement units, contact our expert staff at Lindemann Chimney Supply for assistance.

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